ALP

Orham Pamuk and World Literature

Studies the novels and non-fiction of Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk as an introduction into ethics and politics of World Literature. Addresses social consequences of Pamuk's role as an intellectual-author who mediates between the national tradition and an international canon. Political implications of Sufism, cultural revolution, Orientalism, and post-colonialism. Secondary focus on cosmopolitan Islam and the Ottoman Empire. Open to graduate students who must follow a comprehensive reading program and complete graduate-level assignments. No prerequisites; taught in English.

The City of Two Continents: Istanbul in Literature and Film

Presents Istanbul, a city located in both Europe and Asia, as a site of political identities in conflict. Overview of contemporary literature and film set in Istanbul. Studies ethical implications of textual and visual representations of various people and groups interacting in urban spaces. Addresses the reasons for Turkey's love-hate relationship with the Ottoman past and Europe. Historical background, modernity, identity, Islam, and cosmopolitanism. Open to graduate students who must follow a comprehensive reading program and complete graduate-level assignments.

The Empire's Western Front: Russian and Polish Cultures

Exploration through literature and film of the relationship between Russian and Polish cultures in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when imperial Russia/Soviet Union figured as Poland's problematic “east,” and subject state of Poland figured as Russia's problematic “west.” Nineteenth century anti-tsarist uprisings, 1920 Soviet-Polish campaign, Poland's postwar sovietization, rise of Solidarity, construction of their respective national identity vis-a-vis an other imagined as foe or friend in fiction, drama, film, memoirs.

The Empire's Western Front: Russian and Polish Cultures

Exploration through literature and film of the relationship between Russian and Polish cultures in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when imperial Russia/Soviet Union figured as Poland's problematic “east,” and subject state of Poland figured as Russia's problematic “west.” Nineteenth century anti-tsarist uprisings, 1920 Soviet-Polish campaign, Poland's postwar Sovietization, rise of Solidarity, construction of their respective national identity vis-a-vis and other imagined as foe or friend in fiction, drama, film, memoirs.

Soviet Art after Stalin 1956-1991

Dissident art, graphic design, fine arts and architecture in context of Cold War and decline of totalitarianism. Themes include Soviet artists and the west, and representation of women in times of flux. Open to juniors and seniors and graduate students who must follow a more comprehensive reading program and complete upper level assignments. One course.

Russian Stylistics and Conversation

Refinement of stylistic control and range in spoken and written Russian through intensive textual analysis, including literary (prose and poetry) texts, popular and scholarly journals, and film. Emphasis on fluent discursive skills, as well as development of expository prose style and rhetorical strategies. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 401 and 402, or consent of instructor. One course.

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